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Heat exhaustion vs. heat stroke

(KWWL) – Most of the state is under an excessive heat warning through Saturday afternoon.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than 600 people die every year from heat-related illnesses.

HEAT EXHAUSTION: Your body’s response to losing water, often through heavy sweating. 
WHAT TO LOOK FOR:
  • Heavy sweating
  • Cold, pale, clammy skin
  • Fast, weak pulse
  • Nausea or vomitting
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Tiredness or weaknessss
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Fainting (passing out)
WHAT TO  DO: 
  • Move to a cool place
  • Loosen your clothes
  • Put cool, wet cloths on your body or take a cool bath
  • Sip water
  • Get medical help if you are throwing up, your symptoms get worse, your symptoms last longer than one hour
HEAT STROKE: Your body cannot cool down. 
WHAT TO LOOK FOR:
  • High body temperature (103 degrees or higher)
  • Hot, red, dry or damp skin
  • Fast, strong pulse
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion
  • Losing consciousness (passing out)
WHAT TO  DO: 
  • Call 911 right away
  • Move the person to a cooler place
  • Help lower the person’s temperature with cool cloths or a cool bath
  • Do not give the person anything to drink
RECOMMENDATIONS
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Check on friends and neighbors at high risk for heat-related illness
  • Find air-conditioned places to cool off (shopping malls and libraries)
  • NEVER leave kids or pets in a closed, parked car
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing
  • Limit time outdoors and take breaks often
Author Profile Photo

Olivia Schmitt

Morning Anchor

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